The golden heart, in the Śabda Institute, refers to radical generosity and openness that arise from a shift in perspective, and not as a mind-based process. Open heartedness is the result of breaking through the walls we build around ourselves; however, this needs to happen in a way that integrates the teachings of the crystal mind and diamond body where the opening is harmonious and infused with beauty.

Level II

Śabda Sāra

Without the irritant, there’s no pearl. We become complacent and dull without the fire of challenge. It’s not in some unknown future that we need to evolve. It’s now.

If we can see that our thoughts come and go and not take their content so seriously, our lives would improve instantly.

The heat of tapas makes way for the nectar of grace.

Like a hamster on a wheel, we run along the well-worn grooves, helplessly reacting in the same old ways to everything that arises in our experience.

For true healing to occur and to get off the cycle of rebirth into suffering, we must become willing to change our habitual ways at any cost. This is how we return to bliss.

The path on which you fall is the path on which you rise.

It is when we arrive at the willingness to give up everything that we make space for the infinite possibilities that exist in every situation. Here we realize that we never owned anything in the first place. This is one of the many paradoxes on the spiritual path.

The habits we cultivate come to determine the company we keep and the stories we tell ourselves about others. Like the layer of dust on the mirror, they keep us from discovering the bliss of our true nature.

Think about all the times when you looked back at an incident that seemed hopeless at the time but in retrospect was the best thing that could have happened. Since we are unable to see into the future or beyond our limited space quantum, we ask for things to be different.

Remaining faithful to our sankalpa is like the bloody battle between Durga and Mahishasura